Railroad Switch Keys and Locks white and gold timberlands

P Panama Railway Item 1-P     Price: $225.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Forged by Adlake.
Superb block lettering and patina.
The Panama Railway greatly contributed to the bldg. of the canal.
A Commonwealth country of the U.S., Panama would love to become
the 51st state in our Union. History

The Panama Canal Railway (Spanish: Ferrocarril de Panama) is a railway line that runs parallel to the Panama Canal, linking the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean in Central America. The route stretches 47.6 miles (76.6 km) across the Isthmus of Panama from Colon (Atlantic) to Balboa (Pacific, near Panama City). It is operated by Panama Canal Railway Company which is jointly owned by Kansas City Southern and Mi-Jack Products.

The infrastructure of this railroad (formerly named the Panama Railway or Panama Rail Road) was of vital importance for the construction of the Panama Canal over a parallel route half a century later. The principal incentive for the building of the rail line was the vast increase in traffic to California owing to the 1849 California Gold Rush. Construction on the Panama Railroad began in 1850 and the first revenue train ran over the full length on January 28, 1855. Referred to as an inter-oceanic railroad when it opened, it was later also described by some as representing a "transcontinental" railroad, despite only transversing the narrow isthmus connecting the North and South American continents

The Panama Canal Railway currently provides both freight and passenger service.

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Pacific Great Eastern Railway SOLD     Price: $125.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and superb patina. History

British Columbia's largest railroad and Canada's third largest was the Pacific Great Eastern Railway of the early 20th century. The system languished for years as an incomplete, money-losing operation with a few hundred miles in service north of Vancouver. This changed after World War II when government funding helped expand the PGE by several hundred miles and it continued to grow throughout the 1980s. By then the railroad was renamed as the British Columbia Railway and efforts were in place to extend it to the Alaskan border, finally allowing that state to connect with the North American rail network. This proposal would ultimately fall through due to rising costs. Later, the BC Rail system disappeared into Canadian National, which now leases the entire railroad from the local government.

Chartered in 1912, the railway was acquired by the provincial government in 1918 after running into financial difficulties. A railway that ran "from nowhere, to nowhere" for over 30 years, neither passing through any major city nor interchanging with any other railway, its southern terminus was at Squamish and its northern terminus at Quesnel during that period. It expanded significantly between 1949 and 1984. Primarily a freight railway, it also offered passenger service, as well as some excursion services, most notably the Royal Hudson excursion train.

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Pennsylvania Railroad Item 3-P     Price: $80.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Adlake forged?
Superb serif lettering and patina. History

Pennsylvania Railroad Company, largest of the trunkline railroads that connected the East Coast of the United States with the interior. It was chartered in 1846 by the Pennsylvania legislature to build a line between Harrisburg and Pittsburgh. Its first passenger train ran in 1848 between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.

Throughout most of its history the Pennsylvania was a prosperous railroad, losing money for the first time in 1946. It suffered from the disadvantage that its route to Chicago had to cross the Appalachians, with grades of greater than 0.5 percent. Its chief competitor, the New York Central, had a water-level route to Chicago. In February 1968 the two railroads merged to form the Penn Central Transportation Company, which absorbed the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company the following year. The new corporation also had a number of subsidiaries in real estate, oil refining, and a variety of other industries.

Penn Central encountered serious management and financial difficulties, however, and was forced into bankruptcy in June 1970. Its passenger services were taken over by the federally established National Railway Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) in 1971. The Penn Central continued to lose money, and, when efforts at reorganization failed, the assets of the railroad were acquired by Consolidated Rail Corporation (Conrail) in April 1976. Operation of the New York-Washington route was later transferred to Amtrak. The Penn Central Corporation continued in business as a diversified corporation not connected with the railroad industry.

The biggest improvement accomplished by the PRR in the 1920s and 1930s was the electrification of its lines from New York to Washington, D.C., and from Philadelphia to Harrisburg. PRR had begun electric operation in 1910 via a direct current (DC) 650-volt third rail that powered PRR locomotives and LIRR passenger cars. PRR was slower to dieselize and when it did so it bought units from every manufacturer.

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Pennsylvania Railroad SOLD     Price: $45.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 5-P     Price: $55.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Attractive block lettering and two-tone patina. Pennsy oldie. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 6-P     Price: $45.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Bohannan forged?
Nice block lettering and gold patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 7-P     Price: $45.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Superb carmel patina.
Unique slope style hilt. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad SOLD     Price: $85.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Great block lettering. Tapered ring barrel.
Superb carmel patina. Doubtful key is a switch key.
One thing about an old key, somewhere there is a matching lock. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Penna Co aka Pennsylvania Railroad Item 8-P     Price: $75.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb serif lettering dark patina. "C" type key. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
   Penna Co aka Pennsylvania Railroad Item 9-P     Price: $115.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina."C" type key.
CTD = Chicago Transportation Dept. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Penna System aka Pennsylvania Railroad Item 10-P     Price: $100.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and superb gold patina.
LC = Locomotive Cab History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Penna Co aka Pennsylvania Railroad Item 11-P     Price: $95.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and patina. Nice oldie!
Different style cut then Penna keys above. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 12-P     Price: $95.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by Fraim/Slaymaker Co.
Superb serif lettering and dark patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 13-P     Price: $50.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Nice serif lettering.
Attractive ring barrel and great gold patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 14-P     Price: $85.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Fraim forged.
Attractive serif lettering and superb patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 15-P     Price: $35.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Fraim forged.
Pocket worn initials and superb patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
    Pennsylvania Railroad
Chicago-Milwaukee & St.Paul Railroad Item 16-P     Price: $35.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Double stamped key. Will work with a steel Adlake MILW lock.
Fourth dual stamp key I've encountered. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pittsburgh-Cincinnati-Chicago & St. Louis Railroad aka, the "Panhandle Railroad Item 17-P     Price: $75.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Attractive serif lettering.
Fine pocket wear and superb carmel patina. History

The Pittsburgh-Cincinnati-Chicago & St. Louis Railroad, commonly called the Pan Handle Route (Panhandle Route in later days), was a railroad that was part of the Pennsylvania Railroad system. Its common name came from its main line, which began at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, crossed the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia, and continued west to Bradford, Ohio, where it split into a northern line to Chicago and a southern one through Indianapolis, Indiana, to East St. Louis, Illinois.

The Columbus-Chicago & Indiana Central Railway went bankrupt and was sold at foreclosure on January 10, 1883. The Chicago-St. Louis & Pittsburgh Railroad was incorporated in Indiana on March 14 and Illinois on March 15, and the former CC&IC was conveyed to the two companies on March 17. Operation by the PC&StL continued until April 1, 1883. On April 1, 1884, the two companies merged to form one Chicago-St. Louis & Pittsburgh Railroad. That company was merged with the PC&StL, Cincinnati & Richmond Railroad and Jeffersonville-Madison & Indianapolis Railroad on September 30, 1890, to form the Pittsburgh-Cincinnati-Chicago & St. Louis Railway (PCC&StL).

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Panhandle Railroad aka, the "Pittsburgh-Cincinnati-Chicago & St. Louis Railroad Item 18-P     Price: $65.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Attractive serif lettering.
History - See 17-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pacific Railroad will consider serious offers Item 19-P     Price: $425.00 Remarks: Operated 1849-1872. Forged by Ritchie & Son.
Fine pocket wear, superb serif lettering and gold patina.
There are 37 different railroads that have "PRR" initials.
Civil War key. Distinct (MoPac) style cut. A rare 168 year old key relic!
Key purchase qualifies you for a free gift --> Free Gift Page History

The Pacific Railroad was a railroad based in the U.S. state of Missouri. It was a predecessor of both the "Missouri Pacific Railroad" and "St. Louis-San Francisco Railway" .

The Pacific was chartered by Missouri in 1849 to extend "from St. Louis to the western boundary of Missouri and thence to the Pacific Ocean. Due to a cholera epidemic in 1849, which was a citywide disaster, and other delays, groundbreaking did not occur until July 4, 1851.

By July 1858 the Pacific Railroad reached Tipton, the eastern terminus for the Butterfield Overland Mail, an overland mail service to San Francisco. The combined rail/coach service reduced mail delivery times between St. Louis and San Francisco from about 35 days to less than 25 days.

In 1865, it became the first railroad to serve Kansas City, after construction was interrupted by the American Civil War. In 1872, the Pacific Railroad was reorganized as the Missouri Pacific Railway by new investors after a railroad debt crisis. Now part of America's largest railroad, "Union Pacific."

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Pacific Coast Railroad (Seattle) Item 20-P     Price: $250.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Nice block lettering and superb patina. A hard key to find.
Key is listed in the "American Railway's Switch Key Directory". History

The carrier was incorporated November 26, 1880, under the general laws of the Territory (now State) of Washington, as The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad Company, for the purpose of constructing and operating a railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla, Wash., and to purchase and operate the property of the Seattle & Walla Walla Railroad Company, On March 20, 1916, under the general laws of the State of Washington, the name of the "Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad" Company was changed to the Pacific Coast Railroad Company. The date of organization of the carrier was November 27, 1880.

The original rail line from Seattle through Maple Valley on its way to Black Diamond was called the Columbia & Puget Sound (C&PS). In 1897 the Pacific Coast Company acquired the C&PS and converted the rail beds to standard gauge, 4 feet 8 1/2" wide track. They also kept the operating name until 1916 when it was rechristened as the Pacific Coast Railroad. By that time both coal mines and railways began a slow decline. The Lawson branch of the railroad was the first to be abandoned in 1918, followed by the Kummer branch in 1931, the Newcastle branch in 1933, and the Taylor branch in 1945. The Pacific Coast Railroad continued operating until 1951 when it merged into the "Great Northern Railway" , which in turn became part of the "Burlington Northern" in 1970. The last train left Black Diamond on September 22, 1970, while Maple Valley saw its last train on March 15, 1980. The tracks were pulled from each line, and today the old rail beds serve as pedestrian paths in the King County Parks' trail system.

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Pacific Coast Railroad (California) Item 21-P     Price: $125.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Nice block lettering and pocket wear.
This key is not a Penn Central. There are no PC or PRR keys
with this style bit. Owned by a Kansas City collector for many years,
key is listed in the "American Railway's Switch Key Directory". History

The Pacific Coast Railway of California was a sister organization to the "Pacific Coast Railroad of Washington" , with both firms owned by Pacific Coast Company. Both railroads were part of a conglomerate, which ran steamships, coal mines, lumber yards, wharves and piers. The primary purpose of the rail lines, wharves, and steamships was to move coal from mine to market, but they also moved other commodities as well as passengers. Coal mines, steamships, and railroads prospered in a symbiotic relationship as coal powered the ships and railroad locomotives, which in turn transported the coal to market.

The original rail line from Seattle through Maple Valley on its way to Black Diamond was called the "Columbia & Puget Sound" (C&PS). In 1897 the Pacific Coast Company acquired the C&PS and converted the rail beds to standard gauge, 4 feet 8 1/2" wide track. They also kept the operating name until 1916 when it was rechristened as the Pacific Coast Railroad. By that time both coal mines and railways began a slow decline. The Lawson branch of the railroad was the first to be abandoned in 1918, followed by the Kummer branch in 1931, the Newcastle branch in 1933, and the Taylor branch in 1945. The Pacific Coast Railroad continued operating until 1951 when it merged into the "Great Northern Railway" , which in turn became part of the "Burlington Northern" in 1970. The last train left Black Diamond on September 22, 1970, while Maple Valley saw its last train on March 15, 1980. The tracks were pulled from each line, and today the old rail beds serve as pedestrian paths in the King County Parks' trail system.

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Penn Central Railroad Item 22-P     Price: $45.00 Remarks: Dates of operation 1968-1976. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina. History

The Penn Central Transportation Company, commonly abbreviated to Penn Central, was an American Class I railroad headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, that operated from 1968 until 1976. It was created by the 1968 merger of the "Pennsylvania" and "New York Central" railroads. The "New York-New Haven & Hartford Railroad" was added to the merger in 1969; by 1970, the company had filed for what was, at that time, the largest bankruptcy in U.S. history.

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Penn Central Railroad Item 23-P     Price: $45.00 Remarks: Dates of operation 1968-1976. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina. History - See 22-P Click on image to view larger picture
    Penn Central Railroad Item 24-P     Price: $25.00 Remarks: Dates of operation 1968-1976. Forged by the Adlake Co.
PC key will work with a Santa Fe derail lock. Same style bit. History - See 22-P Click on image to view larger picture
  Penn Central Railroad Item 25-P     Price: $30.00 Remarks: Dates of operation 1968-1976. Forged by the Adlake Co. History - See 22-P Click on image to view larger picture
Peoria Railway Terminal Item 26-P     Price: $95.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Peoria short line.
Rustic serif lettering and patina. Owned by the Rock Island,
Chicago & Alton and Peoria & Pekin Railroads. History

The Peoria Terminal was incorporated January 18, 1926, under the general laws of Illinois, to acquire the property of the Peoria Terminal Railway Company.

The Peoria Terminal owns and uses 20.905 miles of all tracks and uses but does not own 8.725 miles of all tracks. It also owns jointly with the Peoria and Pekin Union Railway Company, 0.243 undivided mile of yard tracks and sidings at Bartonville, Ill. In addition, the Peoria Terminal has trackage rights over about 1.39 miles of road owned by other carriers at Pekin and Peoria, Ill.

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      Philadelphia Rapid Transit Co Item 27-P     Price: $100.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Phily's interurban line.
Superb block lettering and bronze patina. History

Established in 1902 as a conglomerate of independent transit companies, the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company began constructing streetcars in West Philadelphia. Within the year, they completed plans for the city's first underground subway system, running under Market Street, as well as a street surface line on Broad Street. The company experienced serious financial straits during the subway's construction, but it was eventually completed in 1905.

Through the first decades of the 20th century, PRT suffered severe labor unrest stemming from financial mismanagement, and trolley and subway operators went on long and sometimes violent strikes in 1909 and 1910. By the 1920s, after an overhaul of company management in which Thomas E. Mitten was installed as company president, PRTC employees were about a sixth of its total stockholders and labor disputes mostly subsided.

In September 1929, Thomas Mitten and the PRT were sued by the city of Philadelphia for charging excessive fees and diverting funds, and the city demanded an independent audit of the company. A month later, Mitten was found drowned in his summer home, and although he left much of his estate for the benefit of PRT, it declared bankruptcy by 1934.

In 1940, PRT was re-organized into a more centralized business out of a splintered model involving sixty-eight different subsidiary companies, and was then called the Philadelphia Transportation Company. Albert Greenfield served as one of the reorganization managers, as well as on the Board of Trustees, and was at least partially responsible for the new company structure. Greenfield received upwards of $95,000 for his work in reorganizing the company. Earnest Trigg, another Greenfield associate, also sat on the Board of Advisors. The Philadelphia Transportation Company was bought by SEPTA in 1968.

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Pacific Electric Railway Item 28-P     Price: $95.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina. Fine pocket wear.
This PE "Ry" key + PE "Co" key below = nice set. History

Pacific Electric, also known as the Red Car system, was a privately owned mass transit system in Southern California consisting of electrically powered streetcars, interurban cars and buses. The PE was the largest electric railway system in the world in the 1920s. Organized around the city centers of Los Angeles and San Bernardino, it connected cities in Los Angeles County, Orange County, San Bernardino County and Riverside County. The system shared dual gauge track with the 3 ft 6 in narrow gauge Los Angeles Railway, "Yellow Car", or "LARy" system on Main Street in downtown Los Angeles (directly in front of the 6th and Main terminal), on 4th Street, and along Hawthorne Boulevard south of downtown Los Angeles toward the cities of Hawthorne, Gardena and Torrance.

In what was called the "Great Merger" of September 1, 1911, the Southern Pacific created a new Pacific Electric Railway Company, which was composed of the original "old" PE, the Los Angeles Inter-Urban Railway, the Los Angeles Pacific Railway, the Los Angeles & Redondo Railway, the San Bernardino Valley Traction Company, San Bernardino Interurban, Redlands Central and the Riverside & Arlington, vhhpolyh. timberland mens boots 6 inch premium wheat with all electrical operations now under the Pacific Electric name. The "Southern Pacific" which, owned 50% of the PE now began to emphasize freight operations. From 1911, when revenue from freight was $519,226, freight revenue climbed to $1,203,956 in 1915, 13% of total revenue.

Following these acquisitions, PE was the largest operator of interurban electric railway passenger service in the world, with 2,160 daily trains over 1,000 miles of track. It operated to many destinations in Southern California, particularly to the south and east.

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Pacific Electric Company Item 29-P     Price: $125.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the M.M. Buck Co.
Attractive serif lettering, tapered barrel and superb gold patina.
This PE "Co" key + PE "Ry" key below or above = nice set. History See 28-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pacific Electric Railway Item 30-P     Price: $95.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Superb serif lettering and carmel patina. Fine pocket wear.
This PE "Ry" key + PE "Co" key above = nice set. History See 28-P Click on image to view larger picture
   Pickens Railroad Item 32-P     Price: $85.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Adlake forged?
Great block lettering and gold patina. South Carolina short line.
Key is listed in the "American Railway's Switch Key Directory". History

The Easley-Pickens line was chartered on December 24, 1890, by the South Carolina General Assembly after two failed attempts to build a railroad through Pickens from Easley. The line connected with the Atlanta & Charlotte Air Line Railroad (later the Southern Railway) and was completed in 1898. On the railroad's first revenue run, the Pickens Railroad suffered a serious derailment that was caused by a local group of boys that had placed spikes on the rails, in their words, "to see what would happen". No one was seriously injured, but caused the fledgling company a serious financial setback, which operated in the red until 1905.

In its early years, it was nicknamed the "Pickens Doodle" because the train would run backwards to Easley and forward to Pickens, which "looked like a doodlebug," according to area residents. The Pickens Railroad, at the time did not have turning facilities until the line built two wye sections of track at each end of the line years later.

In the 1920s, Singer Manufacturing located a sewing machine cabinet plant on the Pickens Railroad. The plant eventually became the railroad's biggest customer and the line was purchased outright in 1939 by Singer. In 1927, the Appalachian Lumber Company built a network of logging lines in the upper portion of Pickens County. By 1939, it too was also acquired by Singer and organized under the Poinsett Lumber and Manufacturing Company. Passenger service was discontinued in 1928 as better roads were built in the region.

In 1959, The Singer Company consolidated its sawmill and cabinet operations with the woodworking operations from Arkansas and the Craftsman power tools from New Jersey to the Pickens location. In 1963, Poinsett Lumber and Manufacturing Company announced that the Pickens Railroad was for sale. James F. Jones of North Carolina purchased the line for approximately $50,000. Jones built a new enginehouse and established a carshop for rebuilding and renovating railroad cars. Jones sold the Pickens in 1973 to Philadelphia-based National Railway Utilization Company (NRUC), which expanded the carshop to build new freight cars.

In the early 1990s NRUC became Emergent Group and sold the railroad to CLC-Chattahoochee Locomotive Corp., which renamed the railroad Pickens Railway Company, according to the Federal Register, 1 May 1996. On April 2, 2013, Pickens Railway pulled the last train to Easley because of lack of business. The final run was pulled by Pickens No.9502 and CLCX No.12132. The last train ended an era of over 100 years of running to Easley.

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   Pine Creek Railroad Item 33-P     Price: $85.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Narrow gauge switch key.
Superb serif lettering and patina. History

The origins of the New Jersey Museum of Transportation began with the purchase of a Baldwin 0-4-0T engine from the Raritan River Sand Company in 1952 by a pair of railroad enthusiasts. This first engine was named the Pine Creek No. 1 and was eventually sold to the Walt Disney company, where it was overhauled and renamed the No.4 Ernest S. Marsh. The engine is still in use today at the California theme park.

Initially a 2.5 acres (1.0 ha) plot of land on Route 9 in Marlboro was purchased where the railroad was run as a tourist attraction, but in 1952 when the organization was facing large property tax increases the not-for-profit Pine Creek Railroad Division of the New Jersey Museum of Transportation was formed and the operations were moved to its present day location in Allaire State Park.

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Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad Item 34-P     Price: $75.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Slaymaker forged?
Large serif lettering and two-tone patina. History

The Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad (P&LE), also known as the "Little Giant", was formed on May 11, 1875. Company headquarters were located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The line connected Pittsburgh in the east with Youngstown, Ohio at nearby Haselton, Ohio in the west and Connellsville, Pennsylvania to the east. It did not reach Lake Erie (at Ashtabula, Ohio) until the formation of Conrail in 1976. The P&LE was known as the "Little Giant" since the tonnage that it moved was out of proportion to its route mileage.
white and gold timberlands

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white and gold timberlands
timberland outlet P Panama Railway Item 1-P     Price: $225.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Forged by Adlake.
Superb block lettering and patina.
The Panama Railway greatly contributed to the bldg. of the canal.
A Commonwealth country of the U.S., Panama would love to become
the 51st state in our Union. History

The Panama Canal Railway (Spanish: Ferrocarril de Panama) is a railway line that runs parallel to the Panama Canal, linking the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean in Central America. The route stretches 47.6 miles (76.6 km) across the Isthmus of Panama from Colon (Atlantic) to Balboa (Pacific, near Panama City). It is operated by Panama Canal Railway Company which is jointly owned by Kansas City Southern and Mi-Jack Products.

The infrastructure of this railroad (formerly named the Panama Railway or Panama Rail Road) was of vital importance for the construction of the Panama Canal over a parallel route half a century later. The principal incentive for the building of the rail line was the vast increase in traffic to California owing to the 1849 California Gold Rush. Construction on the Panama Railroad began in 1850 and the first revenue train ran over the full length on January 28, 1855. Referred to as an inter-oceanic railroad when it opened, it was later also described by some as representing a "transcontinental" railroad, despite only transversing the narrow isthmus connecting the North and South American continents

The Panama Canal Railway currently provides both freight and passenger service.

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Pacific Great Eastern Railway SOLD     Price: $125.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Nice block lettering and superb patina. History

British Columbia's largest railroad and Canada's third largest was the Pacific Great Eastern Railway of the early 20th century. The system languished for years as an incomplete, money-losing operation with a few hundred miles in service north of Vancouver. This changed after World War II when government funding helped expand the PGE by several hundred miles and it continued to grow throughout the 1980s. By then the railroad was renamed as the British Columbia Railway and efforts were in place to extend it to the Alaskan border, finally allowing that state to connect with the North American rail network. This proposal would ultimately fall through due to rising costs. Later, the BC Rail system disappeared into Canadian National, which now leases the entire railroad from the local government.

Chartered in 1912, the railway was acquired by the provincial government in 1918 after running into financial difficulties. A railway that ran "from nowhere, to nowhere" for over 30 years, neither passing through any major city nor interchanging with any other railway, its southern terminus was at Squamish and its northern terminus at Quesnel during that period. It expanded significantly between 1949 and 1984. Primarily a freight railway, it also offered passenger service, as well as some excursion services, most notably the Royal Hudson excursion train.

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Pennsylvania Railroad Item 3-P     Price: $80.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Adlake forged?
Superb serif lettering and patina. History

Pennsylvania Railroad Company, largest of the trunkline railroads that connected the East Coast of the United States with the interior. It was chartered in 1846 by the Pennsylvania legislature to build a line between Harrisburg and Pittsburgh. Its first passenger train ran in 1848 between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh.

Throughout most of its history the Pennsylvania was a prosperous railroad, losing money for the first time in 1946. It suffered from the disadvantage that its route to Chicago had to cross the Appalachians, with grades of greater than 0.5 percent. Its chief competitor, the New York Central, had a water-level route to Chicago. In February 1968 the two railroads merged to form the Penn Central Transportation Company, which absorbed the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company the following year. The new corporation also had a number of subsidiaries in real estate, oil refining, and a variety of other industries.

Penn Central encountered serious management and financial difficulties, however, and was forced into bankruptcy in June 1970. Its passenger services were taken over by the federally established National Railway Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) in 1971. The Penn Central continued to lose money, and, when efforts at reorganization failed, the assets of the railroad were acquired by Consolidated Rail Corporation (Conrail) in April 1976. Operation of the New York-Washington route was later transferred to Amtrak. The Penn Central Corporation continued in business as a diversified corporation not connected with the railroad industry.

The biggest improvement accomplished by the PRR in the 1920s and 1930s was the electrification of its lines from New York to Washington, D.C., and from Philadelphia to Harrisburg. PRR had begun electric operation in 1910 via a direct current (DC) 650-volt third rail that powered PRR locomotives and LIRR passenger cars. PRR was slower to dieselize and when it did so it bought units from every manufacturer.

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Pennsylvania Railroad SOLD     Price: $45.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 5-P     Price: $55.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Attractive block lettering and two-tone patina. Pennsy oldie. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 6-P     Price: $45.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Bohannan forged?
Nice block lettering and gold patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 7-P     Price: $45.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Superb carmel patina.
Unique slope style hilt. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad SOLD     Price: $85.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Great block lettering. Tapered ring barrel.
Superb carmel patina. Doubtful key is a switch key.
One thing about an old key, somewhere there is a matching lock. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Penna Co aka Pennsylvania Railroad Item 8-P     Price: $75.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb serif lettering dark patina. "C" type key. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
   Penna Co aka Pennsylvania Railroad Item 9-P     Price: $115.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina."C" type key.
CTD = Chicago Transportation Dept. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Penna System aka Pennsylvania Railroad Item 10-P     Price: $100.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Attractive block lettering and superb gold patina.
LC = Locomotive Cab History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Penna Co aka Pennsylvania Railroad Item 11-P     Price: $95.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and patina. Nice oldie!
Different style cut then Penna keys above. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 12-P     Price: $95.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by Fraim/Slaymaker Co.
Superb serif lettering and dark patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 13-P     Price: $50.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Nice serif lettering.
Attractive ring barrel and great gold patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 14-P     Price: $85.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Fraim forged.
Attractive serif lettering and superb patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pennsylvania Railroad Item 15-P     Price: $35.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Fraim forged.
Pocket worn initials and superb patina. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
    Pennsylvania Railroad
Chicago-Milwaukee & St.Paul Railroad Item 16-P     Price: $35.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Double stamped key. Will work with a steel Adlake MILW lock.
Fourth dual stamp key I've encountered. History - See 3-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pittsburgh-Cincinnati-Chicago & St. Louis Railroad aka, the "Panhandle Railroad Item 17-P     Price: $75.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Attractive serif lettering.
Fine pocket wear and superb carmel patina. History

The Pittsburgh-Cincinnati-Chicago & St. Louis Railroad, commonly called the Pan Handle Route (Panhandle Route in later days), was a railroad that was part of the Pennsylvania Railroad system. Its common name came from its main line, which began at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, crossed the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia, and continued west to Bradford, Ohio, where it split into a northern line to Chicago and a southern one through Indianapolis, Indiana, to East St. Louis, Illinois.

The Columbus-Chicago & Indiana Central Railway went bankrupt and was sold at foreclosure on January 10, 1883. The Chicago-St. Louis & Pittsburgh Railroad was incorporated in Indiana on March 14 and Illinois on March 15, and the former CC&IC was conveyed to the two companies on March 17. Operation by the PC&StL continued until April 1, 1883. On April 1, 1884, the two companies merged to form one Chicago-St. Louis & Pittsburgh Railroad. That company was merged with the PC&StL, Cincinnati & Richmond Railroad and Jeffersonville-Madison & Indianapolis Railroad on September 30, 1890, to form the Pittsburgh-Cincinnati-Chicago & St. Louis Railway (PCC&StL).

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Panhandle Railroad aka, the "Pittsburgh-Cincinnati-Chicago & St. Louis Railroad Item 18-P     Price: $65.00 Remarks: Circa; early-mid 1900's. Attractive serif lettering.
History - See 17-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pacific Railroad will consider serious offers Item 19-P     Price: $425.00 Remarks: Operated 1849-1872. Forged by Ritchie & Son.
Fine pocket wear, superb serif lettering and gold patina.
There are 37 different railroads that have "PRR" initials.
Civil War key. Distinct (MoPac) style cut. A rare 168 year old key relic!
Key purchase qualifies you for a free gift --> Free Gift Page History

The Pacific Railroad was a railroad based in the U.S. state of Missouri. It was a predecessor of both the "Missouri Pacific Railroad" and "St. Louis-San Francisco Railway" .

The Pacific was chartered by Missouri in 1849 to extend "from St. Louis to the western boundary of Missouri and thence to the Pacific Ocean. Due to a cholera epidemic in 1849, which was a citywide disaster, and other delays, groundbreaking did not occur until July 4, 1851.

By July 1858 the Pacific Railroad reached Tipton, the eastern terminus for the Butterfield Overland Mail, an overland mail service to San Francisco. The combined rail/coach service reduced mail delivery times between St. Louis and San Francisco from about 35 days to less than 25 days.

In 1865, it became the first railroad to serve Kansas City, after construction was interrupted by the American Civil War. In 1872, the Pacific Railroad was reorganized as the Missouri Pacific Railway by new investors after a railroad debt crisis. Now part of America's largest railroad, "Union Pacific."

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Pacific Coast Railroad (Seattle) Item 20-P     Price: $250.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Nice block lettering and superb patina. A hard key to find.
Key is listed in the "American Railway's Switch Key Directory". History

The carrier was incorporated November 26, 1880, under the general laws of the Territory (now State) of Washington, as The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad Company, for the purpose of constructing and operating a railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla, Wash., and to purchase and operate the property of the Seattle & Walla Walla Railroad Company, On March 20, 1916, under the general laws of the State of Washington, the name of the "Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad" Company was changed to the Pacific Coast Railroad Company. The date of organization of the carrier was November 27, 1880.

The original rail line from Seattle through Maple Valley on its way to Black Diamond was called the Columbia & Puget Sound (C&PS). In 1897 the Pacific Coast Company acquired the C&PS and converted the rail beds to standard gauge, 4 feet 8 1/2" wide track. They also kept the operating name until 1916 when it was rechristened as the Pacific Coast Railroad. By that time both coal mines and railways began a slow decline. The Lawson branch of the railroad was the first to be abandoned in 1918, followed by the Kummer branch in 1931, the Newcastle branch in 1933, and the Taylor branch in 1945. The Pacific Coast Railroad continued operating until 1951 when it merged into the "Great Northern Railway" , which in turn became part of the "Burlington Northern" in 1970. The last train left Black Diamond on September 22, 1970, while Maple Valley saw its last train on March 15, 1980. The tracks were pulled from each line, and today the old rail beds serve as pedestrian paths in the King County Parks' trail system.

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Pacific Coast Railroad (California) Item 21-P     Price: $125.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Nice block lettering and pocket wear.
This key is not a Penn Central. There are no PC or PRR keys
with this style bit. Owned by a Kansas City collector for many years,
key is listed in the "American Railway's Switch Key Directory". History

The Pacific Coast Railway of California was a sister organization to the "Pacific Coast Railroad of Washington" , with both firms owned by Pacific Coast Company. Both railroads were part of a conglomerate, which ran steamships, coal mines, lumber yards, wharves and piers. The primary purpose of the rail lines, wharves, and steamships was to move coal from mine to market, but they also moved other commodities as well as passengers. Coal mines, steamships, and railroads prospered in a symbiotic relationship as coal powered the ships and railroad locomotives, which in turn transported the coal to market.

The original rail line from Seattle through Maple Valley on its way to Black Diamond was called the "Columbia & Puget Sound" (C&PS). In 1897 the Pacific Coast Company acquired the C&PS and converted the rail beds to standard gauge, 4 feet 8 1/2" wide track. They also kept the operating name until 1916 when it was rechristened as the Pacific Coast Railroad. By that time both coal mines and railways began a slow decline. The Lawson branch of the railroad was the first to be abandoned in 1918, followed by the Kummer branch in 1931, the Newcastle branch in 1933, and the Taylor branch in 1945. The Pacific Coast Railroad continued operating until 1951 when it merged into the "Great Northern Railway" , which in turn became part of the "Burlington Northern" in 1970. The last train left Black Diamond on September 22, 1970, while Maple Valley saw its last train on March 15, 1980. The tracks were pulled from each line, and today the old rail beds serve as pedestrian paths in the King County Parks' trail system.

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Penn Central Railroad Item 22-P     Price: $45.00 Remarks: Dates of operation 1968-1976. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina. History

The Penn Central Transportation Company, commonly abbreviated to Penn Central, was an American Class I railroad headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, that operated from 1968 until 1976. It was created by the 1968 merger of the "Pennsylvania" and "New York Central" railroads. The "New York-New Haven & Hartford Railroad" was added to the merger in 1969; by 1970, the company had filed for what was, at that time, the largest bankruptcy in U.S. history.

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Penn Central Railroad Item 23-P     Price: $45.00 Remarks: Dates of operation 1968-1976. Forged by the Adlake Co.
Superb block lettering and patina. History - See 22-P Click on image to view larger picture
    Penn Central Railroad Item 24-P     Price: $25.00 Remarks: Dates of operation 1968-1976. Forged by the Adlake Co.
PC key will work with a Santa Fe derail lock. Same style bit. History - See 22-P Click on image to view larger picture
  Penn Central Railroad Item 25-P     Price: $30.00 Remarks: Dates of operation 1968-1976. Forged by the Adlake Co. History - See 22-P Click on image to view larger picture
Peoria Railway Terminal Item 26-P     Price: $95.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Peoria short line.
Rustic serif lettering and patina. Owned by the Rock Island,
Chicago & Alton and Peoria & Pekin Railroads. History

The Peoria Terminal was incorporated January 18, 1926, under the general laws of Illinois, to acquire the property of the Peoria Terminal Railway Company.

The Peoria Terminal owns and uses 20.905 miles of all tracks and uses but does not own 8.725 miles of all tracks. It also owns jointly with the Peoria and Pekin Union Railway Company, 0.243 undivided mile of yard tracks and sidings at Bartonville, Ill. In addition, the Peoria Terminal has trackage rights over about 1.39 miles of road owned by other carriers at Pekin and Peoria, Ill.

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      Philadelphia Rapid Transit Co Item 27-P     Price: $100.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Phily's interurban line.
Superb block lettering and bronze patina. History

Established in 1902 as a conglomerate of independent transit companies, the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company began constructing streetcars in West Philadelphia. Within the year, they completed plans for the city's first underground subway system, running under Market Street, as well as a street surface line on Broad Street. The company experienced serious financial straits during the subway's construction, but it was eventually completed in 1905.

Through the first decades of the 20th century, PRT suffered severe labor unrest stemming from financial mismanagement, and trolley and subway operators went on long and sometimes violent strikes in 1909 and 1910. By the 1920s, after an overhaul of company management in which Thomas E. Mitten was installed as company president, PRTC employees were about a sixth of its total stockholders and labor disputes mostly subsided.

In September 1929, Thomas Mitten and the PRT were sued by the city of Philadelphia for charging excessive fees and diverting funds, and the city demanded an independent audit of the company. A month later, Mitten was found drowned in his summer home, and although he left much of his estate for the benefit of PRT, it declared bankruptcy by 1934.

In 1940, PRT was re-organized into a more centralized business out of a splintered model involving sixty-eight different subsidiary companies, and was then called the Philadelphia Transportation Company. Albert Greenfield served as one of the reorganization managers, as well as on the Board of Trustees, and was at least partially responsible for the new company structure. Greenfield received upwards of $95,000 for his work in reorganizing the company. Earnest Trigg, another Greenfield associate, also sat on the Board of Advisors. The Philadelphia Transportation Company was bought by SEPTA in 1968.

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Pacific Electric Railway Item 28-P     Price: $95.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the A&W Co.
Superb block lettering and gold patina. Fine pocket wear.
This PE "Ry" key + PE "Co" key below = nice set. History

Pacific Electric, also known as the Red Car system, was a privately owned mass transit system in Southern California consisting of electrically powered streetcars, interurban cars and buses. The PE was the largest electric railway system in the world in the 1920s. Organized around the city centers of Los Angeles and San Bernardino, it connected cities in Los Angeles County, Orange County, San Bernardino County and Riverside County. The system shared dual gauge track with the 3 ft 6 in narrow gauge Los Angeles Railway, "Yellow Car", or "LARy" system on Main Street in downtown Los Angeles (directly in front of the 6th and Main terminal), on 4th Street, and along Hawthorne Boulevard south of downtown Los Angeles toward the cities of Hawthorne, Gardena and Torrance.

In what was called the "Great Merger" of September 1, 1911, the Southern Pacific created a new Pacific Electric Railway Company, which was composed of the original "old" PE, the Los Angeles Inter-Urban Railway, the Los Angeles Pacific Railway, the Los Angeles & Redondo Railway, the San Bernardino Valley Traction Company, San Bernardino Interurban, Redlands Central and the Riverside & Arlington, with all electrical operations now under the Pacific Electric name. The "Southern Pacific" which, owned 50% of the PE now began to emphasize freight operations. From 1911, when revenue from freight was $519,226, freight revenue climbed to $1,203,956 in 1915, 13% of total revenue.

Following these acquisitions, PE was the largest operator of interurban electric railway passenger service in the world, with 2,160 daily trains over 1,000 miles of track. It operated to many destinations in Southern California, particularly to the south and east.

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Pacific Electric Company Item 29-P     Price: $125.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Forged by the M.M. Buck Co.
Attractive serif lettering, tapered barrel and superb gold patina.
This PE "Co" key + PE "Ry" key below or above = nice set. History See 28-P Click on image to view larger picture
Pacific Electric Railway Item 30-P     Price: $95.00 Remarks: Circa; early 1900's. Fraim forged.
Superb serif lettering and carmel patina. Fine pocket wear.
This PE "Ry" key + PE "Co" key above = nice set. History See 28-P Click on image to view larger picture
   Pickens Railroad Item 32-P     Price: $85.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Adlake forged?
Great block lettering and gold patina. South Carolina short line.
Key is listed in the "American Railway's Switch Key Directory". History

The Easley-Pickens line was chartered on December 24, 1890, by the South Carolina General Assembly after two failed attempts to build a railroad through Pickens from Easley. The line connected with the Atlanta & Charlotte Air Line Railroad (later the Southern Railway) and was completed in 1898. On the railroad's first revenue run, the Pickens Railroad suffered a serious derailment that was caused by a local group of boys that had placed spikes on the rails, in their words, "to see what would happen". No one was seriously injured, but caused the fledgling company a serious financial setback, which operated in the red until 1905.

In its early years, it was nicknamed the "Pickens Doodle" because the train would run backwards to Easley and forward to Pickens, which "looked like a doodlebug," according to area residents. The Pickens Railroad, at the time did not have turning facilities until the line built two wye sections of track at each end of the line years later.

In the 1920s, Singer Manufacturing located a sewing machine cabinet plant on the Pickens Railroad. The plant eventually became the railroad's biggest customer and the line was purchased outright in 1939 by Singer. In 1927, the Appalachian Lumber Company built a network of logging lines in the upper portion of Pickens County. By 1939, it too was also acquired by Singer and organized under the Poinsett Lumber and Manufacturing Company. Passenger service was discontinued in 1928 as better roads were built in the region.

In 1959, The Singer Company consolidated its sawmill and cabinet operations with the woodworking operations from Arkansas and the Craftsman power tools from New Jersey to the Pickens location. In 1963, Poinsett Lumber and Manufacturing Company announced that the Pickens Railroad was for sale. James F. Jones of North Carolina purchased the line for approximately $50,000. Jones built a new enginehouse and established a carshop for rebuilding and renovating railroad cars. Jones sold the Pickens in 1973 to Philadelphia-based National Railway Utilization Company (NRUC), which expanded the carshop to build new freight cars.

In the early 1990s NRUC became Emergent Group and sold the railroad to CLC-Chattahoochee Locomotive Corp., which renamed the railroad Pickens Railway Company, according to the Federal Register, 1 May 1996. On April 2, 2013, Pickens Railway pulled the last train to Easley because of lack of business. The final run was pulled by Pickens No.9502 and CLCX No.12132. The last train ended an era of over 100 years of running to Easley.

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   Pine Creek Railroad Item 33-P     Price: $85.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Narrow gauge switch key.
Superb serif lettering and patina. History

The origins of the New Jersey Museum of Transportation began with the purchase of a Baldwin 0-4-0T engine from the Raritan River Sand Company in 1952 by a pair of railroad enthusiasts. This first engine was named the Pine Creek No. 1 and was eventually sold to the Walt Disney company, where it was overhauled and renamed the No.4 Ernest S. Marsh. The engine is still in use today at the California theme park.

Initially a 2.5 acres (1.0 ha) plot of land on Route 9 in Marlboro was purchased where the railroad was run as a tourist attraction, but in 1952 when the organization was facing large property tax increases the not-for-profit Pine Creek Railroad Division of the New Jersey Museum of Transportation was formed and the operations were moved to its present day location in Allaire State Park.

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Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad Item 34-P     Price: $75.00 Remarks: Circa; mid 1900's. Slaymaker forged?
Large serif lettering and two-tone patina. History

The Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad (P&LE), also known as the "Little Giant", was formed on May 11, 1875. Company headquarters were located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The line connected Pittsburgh in the east with Youngstown, Ohio at nearby Haselton, Ohio in the west and Connellsville, Pennsylvania to the east. It did not reach Lake Erie (at Ashtabula, Ohio) until the formation of Conrail in 1976. The P&LE was known as the "Little Giant" since the tonnage that it moved was out of proportion to its route mileage.

About

The City of Gold Bar is situated at the foothills of the Cascade Mountains.  We are the gateway to the Cascade Mountains.  The Cascade Mountains are a host to a multitude of summer and winter outdoor activities.

City of Gold Bar Mission Statement

The City of Gold Bar’s heritage of mining and logging is reflected as we grow into a financially sound, community oriented city where recreation is our community’s business and our rural character is our community treasure.

About the History of Gold Bar

The early Indian residents in the vicinity of what is now Gold Bar, known as the Skykomish, were a subdivision of the Snohomish Peoples whose region was the Snohomish River Basin extending from the mouth of the river to the crest of the Cascades. Their annual living and travel patterns centered around hunting, fishing, and plant gathering seasons. Shelters during gathering seasons were temporary pole and mat or brush shelters. Permanent villages occupied during the winter months were large cedar plank houses.

The first white men to explore the Gold Bar area were most likely fur trappers, traders and prospectors. The first recorded visit to the Gold Bar area occurred in the years 1859 and 1860 when survey parties sent out by the developers of Snohomish town site traveled up the Skykomish Valley. Convinced that the trail leading from the Eastern Washington gold fields, across the Cascades and down the Skykomish and Snohomish River valleys would benefit their proposed town, the promoters of the city of Snohomish determined to establish such a route. It was in the course of locating this trail that the survey parties passed the future site of Gold Bar. Beyond locating Cady Pass, the trail project was a failure.

In 1890, Mr. Andrew Haggerty bought timber from the settlers and logged the area about Gold Bar. In 1892, he gave the Great Northern Railroad land for the right-of-way, with the idea that the company would build a freight terminal. This plan did not materialize for twenty years.

As a mineral, Gold held an interest for many. A prospector named Boyce is said to have found traces of gold in the Skykomish River. He hired Chinese laborers for $1 per day. With equipment made of wood, the Chinese dug out a big hole, using a dredge built on a float. This was located east of town, across the railroad tracks from Clancey’s Motel. Each worker took enough gold from the river to enrich their employer by about $3 per day and to cause the locality to be named Gold Bar.

An early historical account of Skagit and Snohomish Counties published in 1906 gives this description of the town’s early history:

“Gold Bar is a thrifty sawmill town of between two and three hundred people, in the Skykomish Valley along the overland line of the Great Northern Railway, 29 miles east of Everett. Platted September 18, 1900, by the Gold Bar Improvement Company, it has grown very rapidly and is now among the substantial villages of the County. A two-story schoolhouse has been erected in which 43 pupils receive instruction, besides which the town enjoys good telephone, telegraph and transportation facilities. As the timberlands become available for agricultural purposes, many small farms are coming into cultivation, thus furnishing additional support for Gold Bar. Last year 886 cars of lumber and shingles were shipped from this point, which is indicative of the town’s volume of business. The Gold Bar Lumber Company operates an extensive lumber and shingle plant there.”

By 1900, the settlement of Gold Bar boasted two houses. Mr. O.S. Lewis built a small mill and cookhouse as well as more homes. The mill was just beyond the McDaniel Garage (now a mobile home park). The millpond was on the shore of May Creek and the bunkhouse and camp were across the creek. At one time, the Gold Bar Lumber Company employed 300 men, as the mill was called. About 100 of this number were Japanese, who did all the common labor. They lived across May Creek at what was called Jap Town.

Mr. Lewis donated two blocks of land on Lewis Street to the town for a school and additional land for a church. In 1901, a one-room school was built and by 1903 the teacher, Mrs. Flint, had more than thirty pupils. The Church was built and dedicated in 1907. The first pastor was Reverend J.M. Wilder, of the Methodist Church.

In 1904, Mr. Lewis and his partner sold the Gold Bar Lumber Company mill and some timber to a Mr. Barnett from Alaska and a Mr. Johansen. Between 1904 and 1908, the company built several homes for employees. A Mr. Croft built a large hotel at the corner of First and Railroad Avenues. Behind the hotel a large building, called the Annex, was built, as was the Croft Building down the street. The mill men, who ate their meals at the Croft Hotel where five women served family style meals, used these buildings. Mr. John R. McKay built the post office and general store in 1906. The town also boasted a saloon, another hotel, and a dance hall.

 

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